Hyde Hall

Lieutenant Governor George Clarke

Lieutenant Governor George Clarke

Lieutenant Governor George Clarke

Oil on canvas painted by James Fellowes (1710-1780)

Active in Cheshire, England (1735-1751)

c.1750

Governor George Clarke returned to England in 1748, remodeled Hyde Hall, his family seat in Cheshire, and died there on January 12, 1760. He commissioned this portrait about 1750.  It remained in England until it was sent to the American Hyde Hall in the 1880s.

Ann Cary Cooper Clarke

Ann Cary Cooper Clarke

Ann Cary Cooper Clarke (1783-1850)

Oil on canvas painted by Charles Ingham  (1797-1863)

1835

Ann Cary Cooper Clarke was the daughter of Col. Richard Cary, of George Washington’s staff.  She married Richard Cooper (1775-1813), the oldest brother of novelist James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), and a land agent for George Clarke.  After Richard Cooper’s death in 1813, she married George Clarke (1768-1835), the builder of Hyde Hall.

George Clarke

George Clarke

George Clarke (1769-1835)

Oil on canvas painted by Adrian Lamb, copy of original portrait by Samuel F. B. Morse in 1829

1976 copy of 1829 original

This is a copy of the original by Samuel F. B. Morse (1791-1872), painted in 1829, which is in the St. Louis Museum of Fine Arts. Morse spent two summers in the Cooperstown area, and executed a number of portraits of local inhabitance as well as at least one landscape, View From Apple Hill. Apple Hill was a house built by Richard Fenimore Cooper in 1800 and owned by his widow, Ann Cary Cooper Clarke in the 1820s.

Anna Clarke Pell

Anna Clarke Pell

Anna Clarke Pell (1817-1899)

Carrera Marble made by  Henry Weekes (1807-1877)

London, England

1852

Henry Weekes (1807-1877), was one of the most popular English sculptors in the mid-Victorian period. He won a gold medal at the Crystal Palace Exhibition in London in 1851, which inspired the Pells to commission this portrait in 1852. Bust is signed Henry Weekes A.R.A Sc.1852.

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