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Chicken Tetrazzini

Recipes from the Ladies of Hyde Hall:

Chicken Tetrazzini

1 ½ -2 cups cooked chicken, diced
4 tablespoons butter
8 mushrooms, sliced
1 small onion, chopped
3 tablespoons flour
2 cups chicken broth
⅔ cup shredded swiss cheese
Salt and pepper
Cooked spaghetti
Parmesan cheese

 

Melt the butter, add mushrooms and onions.  Saute until soft but not brown.  Blend in the flour and then add the chicken broth.  Stir until smooth and thickened.  Add the Swiss cheese.  As soon as it is melted, turn off heat and stir in chicken.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  

Put a layer of cooked spaghetti in the bottom of buttered shallow baking dish.  Remember: proportions are ½ spaghetti to ⅔ chicken.  Spoon the chicken mixture on top of spaghetti and dust liberally with grated Parmesan cheese.  Bake at 350 degrees for about 15-20 minutes or until golden brown and bubbly.  (Serves 2-3).  

Polly Clarke Paton

Giltwood Style Mirrors

The largest of three mirrors is shown hanging above a mahogany pier table in the drawing room.

When it came time to furnish the main entertaining spaces of Hyde Hall in the 1830s, George Clarke selected strong, masculine, classical furniture. For the drawing room in 1833 he ordered three giltwood looking glasses from Isaac L. Platt (1793 – 1875), a New York picture-frame maker. The glass of two of the mirrors measures 66 inches long by 60 inches wide; a third, the largest, is 76 inches long by 36 inches wide. All are framed with 4-1/2-inch fluted moldings fastened with bold corner blocks. Total cost for glass and frames, not including shipping and handling was $591, which would buy you about $15,700 worth of goods in today’s money.

Hotch Potch – A Perfect Stew for a Winter Day

A recipe from Ann Low Cary Cooper Clarke’s Time (1819-1842), The Ladies of Hyde Hall

 

Hotch Potch

2 lbs of lean beef, cut into mince
2 onions
2 carrots
½ can tomatoes
1 bunch sweet hops, chopped
Salt and pepper
2 potatoes
1 cup corn
2 turnips
2 stalks celery
½ small cabbage
2 tablespoons butter

Wash, scrape and slice the vegetables and put all except the tomatoes into a pot.  Cover with hot water and boil gently for 10 minutes.  Drain off the water.  Put a handful of the mixed vegetables, including the tomatoes , in the bottom of a stone jar.  Pepper and salt, minced raw beef…repeat the order until your materials are all in the pot.

Fit a top over the mouth, tie down with stout greased paper, set it within the oven and let it alone for 5-6 hours, except that you must look now and then to see that the paper does not take fire.  Prevent this by greasing it abundantly.

At the end of this time, turn out the hotch potch.  Stir in the butter and, if needed, additional seasonings.  Serve it in a tureen.

A Makeover for the Dining Room

Fans of reality TV shows might recognize Hyde Hall as being a huge “Before & Afer” makeover project. Soon Hyde Hall will be the scene of yet another episode: the transformation of the Dining Room walls.

We have asked Lori Wilson, internationally known paint expert, artist, teacher, and master painter, to restore the Dining Room walls to their 1830s appearance.

Long associated with Golden Artist Colors of New Berlin, New York, Lori brings many years of experience to Hyde Hall. Her goal will be to reproduce in the Dining Room the same marbleized treatment that has survived in the Drawing Room and Entrance Hall. In the 1880s, the Dining Room walls were painted a once-fashionable Victorian red, but with restorations now focused on recreating the earliest appearance of the Great House, these three major rooms will soon present  the unified ensemble that George Clarke created in 1833.

While painting a room might seem simple, the Dining Room project has posed interesting challenges. The first task was to test the Dining Room wall surface to determine what course to follow in the restoration of the original color. Lori discovered that the red pigment is very difficult to remove, and in the areas she tested, the pigment was deeply absorbed into the plaster walls—all the way down to the second or brown coat layer. Based on this discovery, she believes the red pigment will not bleed through the new thin skin of limewash that she would like to spread over the surface of the Dining Room walls. Not having to remove all of the red paint (a time-consuming and difficult process) is a major advantage. It is interesting to note that the limewash she plans to use will contain mica and black pigmentation similar to the original surface.

To avoid the possibility of bleed-through or delamination, Lori recommends that we test select areas in the Dining Room with different surface treatments over the fall, winter, and spring seasons. The goal is to choose a durable new finish treatment that will adhere to the present surface. This means we must delay the Dining Room carpet installation until May or early June of 2017. It is a small price to pay for better results.

We are grateful for the care and thoroughness of Lori Wilson’s analysis. We hope you will visit us next May during tours to see her at work recreating the marbleized surfaces that make Hyde Hall a model of 1830s elegance and sophistication.

From the Fall 2016 Hyde Hall Newsletter

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